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Sony Bravia KDL-46HX729 Review

46 in.

Sony really loaded up on features for this high-end model, but the company missed the mark on 3D.

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Science Introduction

Along the lines of performance only—meaning exempting 3D tech and the menu interface—Sony's high-end HX729 series is a high-quality performer. In particular, it tested with an impressively strong peak brightness, a great natural contrast ratio, and particularly smooth, uniform color curves.

Contrast

The bright white level on the HX729 means you can enjoy it in a sunny living room.

The Sony Bravia KDL-46HX729 has a tremendously bright screen, managing peak brightnesses upwards of 358.63 cd/m2. This is very bright—about three and a half times as bright as the average budget plasma TV. The advantage of this brightness is that it adds considerable spectrum detail to the way the HX729 produces highlight tones, the brightest colors and whites, adding edge detail to on-screen objects. It also means that the HX729 can compete with sunny, overly lit rooms, but if it's too bright, you can always turn the backlight down to suit your preferences.

Other TVs outclass this one's dark level, which measured at just 0.07 cd/m2, yet in the end, we found a contrast ratio of 5123:1. That’s quite good, if you look at how it stacks up against the competition. More on how we test contrast.

Color

The HX729 provides a wide spectrum of color detail across the entire luminosity input.

The HX729 tested with even sloping, smooth color curves. What this means is that red, green, blue, grey, and everything in between will feature smoothly transitioning levels of hues and shades, producing a color-rich picture that looks both impressive and realistic. Due to its wide contrast ratio, the HX729 is capable of allocating solid detail to the full color spectrum—shadow tones, midtones, and highlights. This is a great attribute. More on how we test color performance.

Other Tests

If you're into science and you want more information about this Sony's time in our lab, just take a look at our gallery.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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