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Panasonic TC-L37X2 LCD HDTV Review

37 in.

The TC-L37X2 is a flawed entry-level LCD from Panasonic.

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Motion Performance

Motion Smoothness (6.0)

The Panasonic TC-L37X2 did pretty well in our motion tests. Objects moving across the screen were not bogged down with any more judders and flickers that we see on most LCD TVs. Unfortunately, the X2 series does not have the same processing feature, Motion Picture Pro 4, that Panasonic offers on the D2 and other series. Those can be useful in smoothing out motion, though they frequently come at the cost of increased artifacting.

Motion Artifacting (5.0)

The Panasonic TC-L37X2 did not suffer from egregious artifacting, but there was noticeable color trailing and judders in moving objects. We also suspect that the TV's extremely high oversharpening (which cannot be turned off) contributed to some of these problems, because high-contrast patterns would create additional problems. More on how we test motion performance.

3:2 Pulldown & 24fps

The Panasonic TC-L37X2 showed no serious problems with native 24fps content, such as what you get from most Blu-Ray movies. In order to get the best performance, you must put the 3:2 pulldown setting in "auto" mode. If it's off, you're going to get a lot of stutter. More on how we test 3:2 pulldown and 24fps.

Resolution Scaling

The Panasonic TC-P37X2 has a native 720p (1280 x 720p) resolution, but much of the content you throw at it will be of higher or lower resolutions. It's up to the TV's internal processing to rescale the image. Unfortunately, the TC-P37X2 does not appear to be very good at this task. It's hard to tell if it's actually a problem with the scaling, per se, because we saw a lot of the same problems in its native resolution. Anyway, the details are below. More on how we test resolution scaling.

480p

The 480p content we tested lost 2% on all sides of the screen to overscan. There were also obvious Moire patterns that appeared when we displayed high-frequency, high-contrast patterns. This is very unusual, because 480p resolution should pose no problems for a decent HDTV.

1080i

The 1080i content we looked at also lost 2% all around to overscan and had huge problems with Moires in high-frequency patterns.

1080p

The 1080p content was just as bad as the 1080i.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. Viewing Effects
  7. Calibration
  8. Remote Control
  9. Connectivity
  10. Audio & Menus
  11. Multimedia & Internet
  12. Power Consumption
  13. Samsung PN42C450 Comparison
  14. LG 32LD450 Comparison
  15. Sony Bravia KDL-32EX700 Comparison
  16. Conclusion
  17. Series Comparison
  18. Photo Gallery
  19. Ratings & Specs
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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