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LG 32LN5700 LED TV Review

32 in.

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Behind the Screens

Welcome to the Science Page, where we store all of the charts and hard data that back up our front page claims. All of our testing is conducted by a staff of expert reviewers, in cooperation with testing software supplied exclusively by DisplayMate. Our color data is gathered using the Konica Minolta CS-200 chroma meter, and our luminance data is gathered using the Konica Minolta LS-100 luma meter.

Contrast Ratio

On the narrow side, even for an LCD

Contrast ratio is what you get when dividing a TV's peak luminance by its minimum luminance. The wider a television's contrast ratio, the more realistically and faithfully it can produce contrasting light levels. The LN5700 tested with a narrow contrast ratio of 1162:1, which is not horrible, but is much less than, say, the five-digit numbers we see on modern plasma televisions.

However, compared to three other 2013 LCDs, the LN5700 doesn't look terrible. It doesn't compete with Samsung's entry-level F5000, but it still has a leg up on the low-end competition from RCA and JVC. This LG's real fault lies with its black level of 0.22 cd/m2, which is more grey than black. Fortunately, you won't really be able to see that during most content, as a high peak brightness of 255.80 cd/m2 ensures that blacks look comparatively dark.

Color Integrity

This LG handles color like a champ

Our color test checks televisions for three key areas: color gamut, color temperature consistency, and the curvature/peaking of color curves. Each of these areas analyzes a different aspect of the television's overall color performance, which is equally important compared to contrast ratio.

The LN5700's color gamut proved very accurate, with peak red, green, and white (reference 255) aligning perfectly to the Rec. 709 standard. This means that those colors are at the proper luminosity and saturation compared to the ideals used in the production of movies, video games, Blu rays, and all digital content.

This LG tested with excellent color temperature consistency. The ideal color temperature for digital displays is a rather cool 6500° K; the LN5700 stayed between 6600° K and 6800° K for almost the entirety of its intensity input (0-255 greyscale). This is a very good out-of-the-box result. Color temperature errors become apparent when a display shifts ±200° from its average temperature. Fortunately, the LN5700 shows no visible error until the very darkest end of its intensity input, straying into cooler (more reddish) hues. These errors occur within shadow tones, where human vision begins to lose color sensitivity. For this reason, the overall result is very good.

Finally, we check red, green, and blue color curves for smoothness in luminance and transition. Poorly transitioning between one hue and its neighboring hues can lead to "banding" in the picture, where gradient material becomes step-like and blocky, destroying immersion. While the LN5700's color and greyscale curves do clip off around 235, the remaining steps ramp slowly and with minimal bumpiness, promising a healthy palette of color and monochrome detail within the picture.

Viewing Angle

The whole family can enjoy this LG

Horizontal viewing angle (or just "viewing angle") is a measure of how far from center you can watch the screen without suffering degradation to the picture. In our case, we measure viewing angle by determining when a TV's contrast ratio drops below 50% of 90° (head-on) viewing.

This LG tested a wider viewing angle than average; compared to three other 2013 LCDs, its total viewing angle of 76° (±38° from center to either side) is quite good. You can expect to be able to watch the LN5700 from acute to middling off angles without suffering contrast degradation.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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