televisions

LG 32LG40 LCD HDTV Review

32 in.

The 32LG40 is a 32-inch set with a basic feature set and a built-in DVD player.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Conclusion & Comparisons

Conclusion
{{article.attachments['LG-32LG40-intro.jpg']}} The 32LG40 is a 32-inch set with a basic feature set and a built-in DVD player. It doesn't have many of the advanced features we typically see on higher-end TVs, like networking, or USB support, but the DVD drive does let the TV play back movies, music and photos. In terms of performance, the 32LG40 was unimpressive. We saw issues with  black level, which ended up hurting its contrast ratio. The screen was uniform, but the TVs greyscale gamma was a bit off, especially with its lack of differentiation between the lower blacks. This is not a good TV for watching dark movies. The 32LG40 doesn't have the best color representation, but it didn't do terribly either. The main issue was that the blues didn't entirely drop off. This means that blacks will always have some blue in them, although the effect isn't terrible noticeable. Motion blurring was an issue. It also suffered from some artifacting issues, most commonly seen as a shuddering effect when it tried to move shapes that involved alternating lines. We were happy with the 32LG40's viewing angle. Typically LCDs do poorly on this test, with total viewing angles around 60º or even less. The 32LG40 managed a very respectable 110º. Like many entry-level HDTVs the 32LG40 had some significant problems. Thankfully it can be found for less than the list price of $850, so if you can find a really good deal on the HDTV it might not be a bad pickup, just know that you're getting a television that won't provide the best picture in the world. It might be a good fit for a student living in a dorm who wants to save space with a built-in DVD player. That said there are other HDTVs that are better value propositions, even taking the built-in DVD player into account. For example the Samsung LN32A450 is another 32-inch HDTV that performed significantly better than the 32LG40 in almost all areas and can be found for significantly less than the 32LG40's $850 list price.

 

Comparisons
{{article.attachments['samsung_ln32a450_intro.jpg']}}

Versus Samsung LN32A450

This match-up is a tough one for the 32LG40. The Samsung LN32A450 was capable of a significantly lower black level and brightness, both of which helped give it a much better contrast ratio. The Samsung also had better color representation. Both TVs had about the same motion issues, but the LG had far less artifacting present. Where the tide starts turning in the 32LG40's favor is on viewing angle: it's capable of a significantly wider angle than the LN32A450. The LG's screen also has far better uniformity than the Samsung's.

The Samsung LN32A450 is less expensive and has better overall picture quality, but is has a significantly inferior viewing angle and a less uniform screen. Despite its shortcomings, we'd side with the LN32A450 on this pairing; just buy a DVD player separately.
{{article.attachments['jvc_lt-32p679_intro.jpg']}}

Versus JVC LT-32P679

In this match-up, the LG 32LG40 is the better overall TV, but not by a huge margin. As with the above comparison, the JVC LT-32P679 has the better black level and better contrast ratio. The 32LG40 had a much, much better greyscale gamma, however, and tended to handle colors better. The 32LG40 also had a much wider viewing angle.

This match-up comes down to cost versus capability. The 32LG40 has better overall video quality, a better viewing angle, and a DVD player but costs a bit more.
{{article.attachments['vizio_sv470xvt_intro.jpg']}}

Versus Vizio SV470XVT

The Vizio SV470XVT beat the 32LG40 pretty soundly on almost all our tests. It actually didn't trouce on the black level test: it performed just as poorly as the 32LG40. It was capable of more brightness, however, and had a significantly better contrast. It also handled colors far better than the 32LG40.

The main snag with the Vizio is that it costs significantly more: $1400 versus $850. The improvement in quality is there, but whether or not it's worth the extra $550 is debateable.

 

{{article.attachments['tvi-prev.jpg']}} Power Consumption Page 14 of 16 Series Comparison {{article.attachments['tvi-next.jpg']}}
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Tour & Design
  2. Calibration
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. Viewing Effects
  7. Remote Control
  8. Audio
  9. Connectivity
  10. Menus & Interface
  11. Formats & Media
  12. Power Consumption
  13. Conclusion & Comparisons
  14. Series Comparison
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

What's Your Take?

All Comments