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VIZIO E3D420VX Review

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The E3D420VX is an LCD TV that promises quite a bit of bang for your 730 bucks.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Science Introduction

For less than $800, you can buy in on this VIZIO—it's smart and 3D ready, on top of being so affordable. That little caveat had us worried that it might not perform to our high standards, but we were mistaken. The VIZIO E3D420VX proved to be a staunch performer, showing off accurate color and decent contrast.

Color Curves

This VIZIO tested with excellent color curves.

Color curve charts visually represent the way a TV displays a full spectrum of red, green, and blue across its full input signal—basically, from black (0) to brightest white (255). Each color is displayed through this 256-step range, and the resulting curve is meant to inform as to how much detail the TV can allocate to each color.

The VIZIO E3D420VX did very well on this test—it displays a full, evenly lit and evenly represented range of reds, greens, and blues, and by admission, each of the colors those primary digital colors create (all of them). This is an excellent result, especially for a TV in this price range. More on how we test color performance.

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Color Temperature

The E3D420VX tested with no visible color temperature error.

Color temperature is a measure of the temperature of the light "within" a color—for example, a light red would have more light passing through it than a darker, more saturated red. Light's color (or lack thereof) is determined by the temperature, in kelvins, of the light passing through it. We run our color temperature consistency test to determine whether a TV displays a consistent color temperature across its luminosity spectrum.

In short, the VIZIO E3D420VX did a remarkable job at maintaining consistent color temperature—all of its light stayed within a single range. While there was some warming and cooling, none of it was drastic enough to even be visible to human eyes; this is the same, for consumer purposes, as having no error whatsoever. More on how we test color performance.

Other Tests

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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