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Sharp Elite PRO-60X5FD LED TV Review

60 in.

With the Elite PRO-60X5FD, Sharp resurrected a fabled name in the prosumer TV realm.

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Science Introduction

The big debate with the Sharp Elite PRO-60X5FD is whether sacrificing contrast for color quality made the picture better, or vice versa. The results were always favorable, but they were never $5,999 favorable.

Contrast

With the Elite Pure settings, this TV can get seriously dark.

Contrast tells the story of how dark a TV gets versus how bright it gets. A television that can get very dark and very bright should be able to show a more detailed image, at least according to conventional thought.

With our calibration methods, the results were good, but not as awe-inspiring as the Elite Pure picture mode. The darkest black level we recorded with our settings was 0.09 cd/m2, which is decent, but does not live up to the fabled heritage of the Pioneer Kuro Elite plasma TV.

But the Elite Pure mode, which tries to emulate the performance of the Pioneer Kuro Elite, was able to produce a superior contrast ratio, although it came at the expense of color accuracy. The deepest black level that we measured was 0.02 cd/m2, which is phenomenally dark. And with a peak brightness of 181.99 cd/m2, the Elite PRO-X5FD achieved a contrast ratio of 9100:1—a fantastic score. More on how we test contrast.

Color

Our calibration settings are better for color.

The color curves produced with our calibration settings (top) were superb. Red, green, blue, and the greyscale ramp up smoothly, meaning that transitional colors and shades of grey will display.

The curves produced by the Elite Pure settings (bottom) were all over the place. The jaggedness of these curves means that they jump up in luminance when certain input signals are given, only to drop down in luminance for the next input signal. The result is an uneven transition from a color’s lowest level to its highest. More on how we test color performance.

Viewing Angle

The Sharp Elite's viewing angle ranges from good to great.

With our calibration methods (top), we weren't able to reproduce the quality black level of the Elite Pure setting. This was noticeable with the viewing angle: our calibration yielded a total viewing angle of 63°, which is good for a TV with an LCD screen.

The Elite Pure settings (bottom) were able to produce a much better total viewing angle of 107°, which is more like the viewing angles produced by plasma TVs. With these settings, the Elite PRO-X5FD was able to keep black images dark at increasingly wide angles. More on how we test viewing angle.

Other Tests

For more information about the Elite's day in the lab, peruse the gallery.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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