televisions

Sharp Aquos LC-60LE650U LED TV Review

60 in.

Sharp's first 2013 TV is an above-average offering.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Science Intro

Sharp's LC-60LE650U impressed us in a few key areas. Contrast was excellent, as was its color temperature. Unfortunately, its actual color accuracy was less than ideal, not to mention its viewing angle wasn't anything to brag about.

Contrast

Above-average contrast, especially the fantastic brightness

With a black level of 0.07 cd/m2 and a peak brightness of 305.64 cd/m2, the Sharp 650U displayed an outstanding contrast. The black level is pretty dark for an LED, plus its white level is excellent—bright enough to make watching daytime TV delightful in a sunny room. Feel free to enjoy Maury and The View to your heart's content.

contrast.jpg

Viewing Angle

While many LCDs struggle with viewing angle, the 650U does not.

With a total viewing angle of 36°, the Sharp 650U won't produce the best looking image when viewed from an angle of more than 18° on either side. We calculate a TV's total viewing angle by measuring contrast at different intervals along an arc. When a TV's contrast drops below 50% of its original value, it has reached its maximum viewing angle.

viewing.jpg

Color

Less-than-ideal color accuracy is a letdown.

Color accuracy is one of the single most important factors in a display. Seeing content exactly the way its creator intended brings immersion—that's the reason we watch TV, right? Sadly, the Sharp LC-60LE650U runs into a few problems in this category. The most egregious error lies in this TV's color gamut. This gamut shows how accurately the 650U produces color in accordance with the international standard. Greens are flawless, but the other two primary colors are not: Reds look muted, while blues are oversaturated, appearing deeper than they should.

Reds look muted, while blues are oversaturated, appearing deeper than they should. Tweet It

The transition from black to a color's peak value was also problematic. Again, green did fine in this test, but reds and blues missed some transitional colors in their ascent to peak luminance. This isn't too bad of a result, but we've seen much better.

Color temperature, which affects the overall tone of the picture, was nearly perfect. The 650U didn't produce any noticeable color temperature error, meaning that whites and greys will show up as they should—no need to worry about any blue or orange hues messing up your TV's picture.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

What's Your Take?

All Comments