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Samsung PN42C450 Plasma HDTV Review

42 in.

The Samsung PN42C450 is a 720p entry-level plasma that fails to dispel the notion that Samsung is an LCD-maker first, followed – at some distance – by plasma manufacturing.

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Value Comparison

The Panasonic TC-P42S2 is a low to mid-priced plasma from the leading manufacturer of plasma TVs. It's a little more expensive than the Samsung PN42C450, but we found the performance to exceed in most respects. While the Samsung has a thinner profile, the quality of the parts was noticeably cheaper than any of the Samsung LCDs we've reviewed. Overall, we'd have to choose the Panasonic.

Blacks & Whites

The Panasonic TC-P42S2 managed a significantly darker black level than the Samsung PN42C450, which created a better contrast ratio for the Panasonic, as well. You could certainly change some settings on the Samsung to make the blacks deeper, but it would darken the peak brightness, as well, or otherwise negatively affect picture quality.

Contrast Chart
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Color Accuracy

The Panasonic definitely outperformed the Samsung in our color tests. The color temperature remained steadier and the RGB color curves were much smoother.



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Motion

The motion performance was more or less a draw between the Samsung PN42C450 and the Panasonic TC-P42S2. Both showed some issues with artifacting, specifically with colors getting "smeared" or broken up into chunky blocks.

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Viewing Effects

The Panasonic took a slight lead in viewing angle, but only by a few degrees. As plasma TVs, both far exceed what even the best LCD is capable of.

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Connectivity

The Panasonic has more AV inputs for older devices, as well as an SD card slow. However, it lacks a USB port and analog audio output. It's a matter of priorities. Decide what you need in a TV for connectivity and make that a part of your buying decision.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. Viewing Effects
  7. Calibration
  8. Remote Control
  9. Connectivity
  10. Audio & Menus
  11. Multimedia & Internet
  12. Power Consumption
  13. Panasonic Viera TC-P42S2 Comparison
  14. Sony Bravia KDL-40NX700 Comparison
  15. Samsung LN40C630 Comparison
  16. Conclusion
  17. Series Comparison
  18. Photo Gallery
  19. Ratings & Specs
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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