televisions

Samsung LN46C530F1F LCD HDTV Review

46 in.

A TV of modest ambitions, and we reward its humility. It just displays a picture... and it does that pretty well.

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Value Comparison

The Toshiba 40G300U is a smaller TV, measuring only 40 inches (there is a 46-inch version, the 46G300U, retailing for $999 that we did not review, and most of the performance results should be the same). The Toshiba definitely lacks the elegance of the Samsung look and feel. But the feature set is stronger: a 120Hz refresh rate, motion smoothing processing, and DLNA support. On the other hand, the Samsung's performance was better in many respects. It's a tough call. We recommend you at least try out a Samsung and a Toshiba in a store before you make this decision.

Blacks & Whites

The Toshiba managed a decent black level, but it couldn't compete with Samsung LN46C530. The peak brightness couldn't compete either, which meant the contrast ratio was a lot narrower.

Contrast Chart
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Color Accuracy

The Samsung LN46C530 managed a much better color performance than the Toshiba 40G300U, which had a harder time stabilizing the color temperature and producing smooth color curves.



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Motion

The Toshiba 40G300U produced a better motion performance in our tests, primarily because it offers the option of a motion smoothing feature called ClearFrame. We don't necessarily advocate the use of ClearFrame because it creates an odd and off-putting look to video, but it's an option, and options and usually good.

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Viewing Effects

The Toshiba had a wider viewing angle than the Samsung LN46C530, but not by a lot. Both are LCD TVs and are no match for a plasma.

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Connectivity

The Toshiba is definitely better equipped, with an additional HDMI and an ethernet port for DLNA connections to home theater networks (though no internet streaming content).

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. Viewing Effects
  7. Calibration
  8. Connectivity
  9. Audio & Menus
  10. Multimedia & Internet
  11. Power Consumption
  12. Toshiba 40G300U Comparison
  13. Samsung PN50C550 Comparison
  14. Sony Bravia KDL-40EX400 Comparison
  15. Conclusion
  16. Series Comparison
  17. Photo Gallery
  18. Ratings & Specs
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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