televisions

LG 47LV4400 LED TV Review

47 in.

For about $1000, you are getting a no-frills television with a fairly unimpressive appearance.

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Science Introduction

The LG 47LV4400 tested with lackluster color detail and a contrast ratio that was only slightly above average. It suffered primarily from massive color temperature problems, but its curves were also choppy and uneven. Its color gamut, while not terrible, was certainly flawed. Combine these things and you end up with a TV that's definitely worse than the average mid-range LCD, even worse than a number of entry-level models.

Color Temperature

The LV4400 tested with color temperature deviation that was—literally—off the charts.

Color temperature is very important to a TV's display prowess. It doesn't determine the colors at hand, but the light that those colors are imbued with. The light should be white and undetectable from a color perspective, only as a way to transmit colors to your eyes. When the light's temperature it off, it takes on either an orange- or blue-tinted quality that clashes with whatever the color is meant to be.

For that reason, the LV4400's color detail was skewered by its horrible color temperature results. Our tests revealed massive visible color temperature error skirting three- or four-thousand degrees off of what it should have been, ranging into hyper-cool territory like it was a member of the Night's Watch. More on how we test color performance.

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Color Curves

The LV4400's curves ramped up much too quickly, losing massive detail from the middle to high-end.

Color and grey curves are a visual representation of how well a TV handles the spectrum of colors it can, or should be able, to produce. Ideally, we want to see the curves moving evenly (as in, not all inhabiting their own space) and describing an even circle. One might say that a circle is made up of a massive amount of tiny flat lines and each of those lines within the color and grey curves represents a single color, giving it the same credence and "length" of support as the color before and after it.

The problem with the LV4400's color curves is not that they are bumpy—though this isn't ideal—it's that they peak too quickly and ramp along through the brightest side of the input spectrum. Any part of any line that isn't moving somewhat diagonally means a lack of light differentiation between one hue or shade and the next. In short, the LV4400's top 20% of colors/greys are all going to be the same. More on how we test color performance.

Other Tests

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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