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LG 32LH20 LCD HDTV Review

32 in.

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Color Accuracy

Color Accuracy Summary
{{article.attachments['LG-32LH20-vanity.jpg']}} • Very stable contrast ratio • Accurate reds, greens and blues

• Above average adherence to color gamut standard

• Tested using DisplayMate software

{{article.attachments['tvi-prev.jpg']}} Blacks & Whites Page 4 of 18 Motion {{article.attachments['tvi-next.jpg']}}

Color Temperature*(9.5)*


Anything that emits light produce tht light at a certain temperature, which can range from warm to cool. Most televisions allow you to adjust the color temperature between several settings, to suit your preferences. Whatever color temperature you choose, what you don't want is for that color temperature to vary as the content on your television screen changes, as this can cause a reddish or bluish cast to appear where you don't want it. in this test we look at how stable the LG 32LH20's color temperature is. Below you can see a graph of the color temperature as we went from a white to a black screen.

Color Temperature
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You can see that the color temperature stays very stable across the vast majority of the greyscale, with only a slight variance appearing at the dark end, which is not uncommon. This is pretty close to ideal, and you won't have to worry about getting a strange cast to your content when watching it on the LG 32LH20.

 

RGB Curves*(8.49)*


All the colors produced by your HDTV are created by mixing red, green and blue, making the accuracy of these colors very important. In this test we take a look at how well the LG 32LH20 reproducing each of these across the intensity range from dark to bright. Blow you can see the curves for each of the three colors, which have been normalized.

RGB Curves
{{article.attachments['LG-32LH20-rgbcurve.jpg']}}

You can see that the LG 32LH20's curves are relatively smooth. There also isn't very much of what we call peaking, which is indicated by by a plateau at the top of the curves. Peaking is a problem as it indicates that the television can't make any more adjustments in the color as it reaches the bright end of the curve, which can lead to loss of detail in bright areas. This isn't a concern with the 32LH20.

Below you can see the 32LH20's color curves displayed as a gradient and compared to an ideal, as well as our three comparison televisions.

 

Red Response Comparisons
Ideal Response {{article.attachments['Ideal-Response-redstrip.jpg']}}
LG 32LH20 {{article.attachments['LG-32LH20-redstrip.jpg']}}
Samsung LN32B360 {{article.attachments['Samsung-LN32B360-redstrip.jpg']}}
Sony KDL-32L5000 {{article.attachments['Sony-KDL-32L5000-redstrip.jpg']}}
LG 37LH55 {{article.attachments['LG-37LH55-redstrip.jpg']}}

 

Green Response Comparisons
Ideal Response {{article.attachments['Ideal-Response-greenstrip.jpg']}}
LG 32LH20 {{article.attachments['LG-32LH20-greenstrip.jpg']}}
Samsung LN32B360 {{article.attachments['Samsung-LN32B360-greenstrip.jpg']}}
Sony KDL-32L5000 {{article.attachments['Sony-KDL-32L5000-greenstrip.jpg']}}
LG 37LH55 {{article.attachments['LG-37LH55-greenstrip.jpg']}}

 

Green Response Comparisons
Ideal Response {{article.attachments['Ideal-Response-bluestrip.jpg']}}
LG 32LH20 {{article.attachments['LG-32LH20-bluestrip.jpg']}}
Samsung LN32B360 {{article.attachments['Samsung-LN32B360-bluestrip.jpg']}}
Sony KDL-32L5000 {{article.attachments['Sony-KDL-32L5000-bluestrip.jpg']}}
LG 37LH55 {{article.attachments['LG-37LH55-bluestrip.jpg']}}

 

Color Gamut*(7.63)*


In order to ensure that the colors you see from content is the same regardless of the television you are viewing it on all HDTVs must meet an international guideline for color gamut known as Rec.709. In this test we look at how well the LG 32LH20 matched this standard. Below you can see a graph of our results, with the 32LH20's color gamut graphed against Rec.709.

Color Gamut
{{article.attachments['LG-32LH20-colorgamut.jpg']}}

You can see that the 32LH20 did a good job, with only a small amount of error in the reds and greens. The error we saw was significantly less than the average HDTV. Below you can see the actual color coordinates that we measured.

  u' (rec.709/measured) v' (rec.709/measured) Error
Red 0.4507 / 0.4461 0.5229 / 0.524 0.00473
Green 0.125 / 0.1267 0.5625 / 0.5566 0.00614
Blue 0.1754 / 0.1737 0.1579 / 0.1554 0.00302
D65 (white point) 0.1978 / 0.1985 0.4683 / 0.4674 0.00114

 

Compare the LG 32LH20 to other HDTVs
{{article.attachments['Samsung-LN32B360-vanity.jpg']}} {{article.attachments['Sony-KDL-32L5000-vanity.jpg']}} {{article.attachments['LG-37LH55-vanity.jpg']}}
Samsung LN32B360 32' Sony KDL-32L5000 32' LG 37LH55 37'
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Tour & Design
  3. Blacks & Whites
  4. Color Accuracy
  5. Motion
  6. Viewing Effects
  7. Calibration
  8. Remote Control
  9. Connectivity
  10. Audio & Menus
  11. Formats & Media
  12. Power Consumption
  13. Vs Samsung LN32B360
  14. Vs Sony KDL32L5000
  15. Vs LG 37LH55
  16. Conclusion
  17. Series Comparison
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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