televisions

JVC BlackCrystal JLE47BC3500 LED TV Review

47 in.

Despite JVC's best efforts, this 2012 LCD asks a little too much and delivers much too little.

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Introduction

Welcome to the Science Page, where all of the hard data and graphs live, eagerly waiting to back up our Front Page claims. All of our television test data is gathered using the Konica Minolta CS-200 colorimeter from televisions sourcing DisplayMate test patterns.

Color Integrity

Highly acceptable color performance

To us, color is the most important aspect of a TV's performance. Many will cite contrast ratio as the more important aspect—but this discussion is better left for a nerdy message board. From a color integrity perspective, the JLE47BC3500 performs well.

Its color gamut results are very close to the international standard, called Rec. 709. Green, blue, and white are all properly saturated and correctly hued—much more difficult than it might seem for many TVs. This JVC's only color gamut problem lies in the production of reds: Reds are undersaturated, meaning they won't be as rich and vivid as they ought to be.

This JVC has an average amount of color temperature error—it's so standard to entry-level models that it's almost not worth mentioning. There's expected warming of the greyscale within shadow tones, meaning a lower temperature and a slight reddening of what should be a colorless grey. Most of this takes place within the darkest shades, however, and won't be easily visible.

The JLE47BC3500 tested with excellent color curves, to cap off its color performance. It transitions smoothly between neighboring shades and hues, meaning it will handle edge gradation well and produce a realistic, satisfying picture. Its one drawback is that it lacks definition at the highest register of the greyscale.

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Black Level

These black levels are disappointing.

Our first encounter with a JVC television revealed some very bad black levels, and unfortunately the company has not made a ton of improvement to this 2012 model. The JLE47BC3500 tested with a black level of 0.19 cd/m2 at half backlight and 0.30 cd/m2 at max backlight; its contrast ratio of 785:1 is just truly unacceptable, even amongst entry-level televisions. This amount of differentiation is not going to take advantage of the TV's greyscale ability. Compared to similarly priced models from 2011 and 2012, though, it's about par for the course.

Viewing Angle

An above-average viewing angle for an LCD

A decent viewing angle will lend flexibility to any TV: This JVC doesn't swivel, which means it definitely needs a good score here. Fortunately, it tested well, boasting a total viewing angle of 66°, or 33° from center to either side of the screen. What this means for the user is more flexibility in choosing where to place your TV, as well as ideal viewing for larger groups without the outliers suffering from a reduced contrast ratio or color shifting at off angles. Compared to similarly priced LCDs, this JVC offers more viewing flexibility than most.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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